float_on_alright: procrastination is hard work (procrastination is hard work)

I’m reading “The Artist’s Way” right now, well I just started it really. One of the things she’s mentions is “morning pages” - three handwritten pages every morning to help get your shit out of your way at the beginning of the day (or at least that’s what it sounds like from what I’ve read so far which again hasn’t been much). I find that idea intriguing and I'm looking forward to seeing what other things she has in store. She recommends reading the book through once before you get started with the activities. I have a copy checked out from the library but I found a copy on ThriftBooks and it’s currently on it’s way to me. I’m hopeful that it will arrive today in the mail so that it will be there when I get home tomorrow. But it isn't a big deal if it takes a few more days for that book and the other couple of books I ordered to get to me especially since I have the library book for a few more days. 

Intellectually, I know that the more you work on being creative, the more you practice being creative, the more easily creativity will happen and flow. But I think my subconscious has been terrified that I’ll “use up” all my creativity and that it will be gone and I’ll have nothing left and then I’ll be empty and it’ll kill me - not in the literal sense, but that I’ll be a husk with no real person left in me. That's not how creativity works. 

When I was writing consistently, 90% less writer’s block than when I was just writing when it struck me. Writing stories begets writing stories. The more that with people about writing and the stories, the more story ideas I had - so many I could rarely keep up with them. I have experience that says I’ll be a more productive writer the more that I write so how it is I still have that fear, I’m not sure. I’m thinking that maybe it’s because I’ve never addressed the fear itself - not head on. Or maybe it’s a fear that will always be something I have to face head on, day after day. And maybe that’s okay. Afterall, the only way to face that fear every day is to write every day. So, here I go, Day 6, to write another story. 


AirPods

Mar. 28th, 2017 11:01 pm
float_on_alright: smiling (smiling)

 The first thing I want to talk about is my AirPods. I was pretty skeptical about them, but I had a pretty decent sized gift certificate to Best Buy and I’m basically a slave the to the Apple so, you know, I had to try them. 
 
Y’all, I was not only not disappointed, I was honestly astounded. It was like I had surround sound speakers instead of tiny earbuds. I kept taking them out to make sure I wasn’t losing it. In order to pair them with my phone all I had to do was put them near each other and then my phone asked if I wanted to use them. So seriously, holy shit, easiest Bluetooth pairing in the history of Bluetooth pairings. And again, the sound quality is something else. I was concerned that they wouldn’t stay in my ears if I was moving around, but they fit really nicely and use the tension of the angle against my jaw to stay in place. I mean, if you’ve used any set of earbuds ever you know it’s a shit time keeping them in your ears so I was super nervous that one or both would constantly be falling out but no, my friends, not at all. They stay perfectly in place with no hassle. It’s unbelievable. 
 
A quick double tap to either earbud and you can activate Siri on whatever device you’re using them with (or answer a phone call). I have tried the Siri function (to skip a song) and it worked wonderfully. I have not yet tried the call feature but I’m sure I will soon just to see how it goes. I’m pretty curious about that. I don’t spend a lot of time on the phone in general and when I am on the phone there is a pretty good chance I’m in my car driving home from work so that isn’t a feature I would use often but it would be nice to see if it worked well. 
 
I am just so very, very pleased with them!
 

Borders

Aug. 3rd, 2011 03:05 am
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (smelling books)
Dear Friends,

I'm sure you've heard that my time in a bookstore will soon be coming to an end. I cannot tell you how much it hurts my heart. I'm not just losing a job. I've worked at Borders as long as I have because I loved it. How many people like going to work? It doesn't seem like many. I'm certainly no fan of my "other job" (you know - the full time one with the health benefits and the better pay).


No, losing Borders doesn't hurt because I'm losing a job. Borders wasn't retail. Borders was date nights, Borders was study sessions, Borders was stomping grounds, meet ups, chess club, book club, game night, Borders was... so much more than a bookstore.


Borders didn't just give me a job, it gave me friends, confidence, support, and a type of safety I can't quite express in words - I really wish I could.


Our store is still operating, hell, we're still getting shipments and we're expecting to keep our doors open for a few more weeks, but it isn't technically Borders any more. Borders is gone, died in the night after a long painful battle.


Goodbye Friend, I miss you. I wish I could bury some part of you, but I guess I'll have to find some other way to put you to rest in and for my own mind.


I'm not sure what this blog will become. Doesn't seem much point in keeping up with a blog about a bookstore when you don't work in one any more but on the other hand, it wasn't like I stuck to any of my goals or initial expectations anyway.

Borders

Aug. 3rd, 2011 03:05 am
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (smelling books)
Dear Friends,

I'm sure you've heard that my time in a bookstore will soon be coming to an end. I cannot tell you how much it hurts my heart. I'm not just losing a job. I've worked at Borders as long as I have because I loved it. How many people like going to work? It doesn't seem like many. I'm certainly no fan of my "other job" (you know - the full time one with the health benefits and the better pay).


No, losing Borders doesn't hurt because I'm losing a job. Borders wasn't retail. Borders was date nights, Borders was study sessions, Borders was stomping grounds, meet ups, chess club, book club, game night, Borders was... so much more than a bookstore.


Borders didn't just give me a job, it gave me friends, confidence, support, and a type of safety I can't quite express in words - I really wish I could.


Our store is still operating, hell, we're still getting shipments and we're expecting to keep our doors open for a few more weeks, but it isn't technically Borders any more. Borders is gone, died in the night after a long painful battle.


Goodbye Friend, I miss you. I wish I could bury some part of you, but I guess I'll have to find some other way to put you to rest in and for my own mind.


I'm not sure what this blog will become. Doesn't seem much point in keeping up with a blog about a bookstore when you don't work in one any more but on the other hand, it wasn't like I stuck to any of my goals or initial expectations anyway.
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (warning opinions in this post)
 
I believe most people wouldn't notice if you were wearing mismatched socks and they wouldn't tell you if you had food in your teeth. I believe no one knows themselves as well as they think they do, and they know even less about everyone else. But, I believe other people know you better than you think they do. I believe there are two kinds of people in the world: those who believe that they know the truth (or, at least know better than everyone else) and those who believe that no one has got anything right. 

I don't trust anyone who profusely uses statistics. I believe we rarely find truth in "simple facts".
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (warning opinions in this post)
 
I believe most people wouldn't notice if you were wearing mismatched socks and they wouldn't tell you if you had food in your teeth. I believe no one knows themselves as well as they think they do, and they know even less about everyone else. But, I believe other people know you better than you think they do. I believe there are two kinds of people in the world: those who believe that they know the truth (or, at least know better than everyone else) and those who believe that no one has got anything right. 

I don't trust anyone who profusely uses statistics. I believe we rarely find truth in "simple facts".
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (marvin - you won't read it)
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I find this question interesting, and I wish I had an interesting answer for it. I think I would choose to have it with (Master - like Master Shake in ATHF - Edward - yes after Twilight and we had rat named Bella, it was funny - Lupin - yes I did name a cat after a fictional werewolf - shut it) Squeaks who was a stray my roommate found my senior year.

The rest of the story is sad if you like cats or have loved a pet (hence the cut), consider this fair warning. 


This is sad if you love pets/cats )
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (marvin - you won't read it)
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I find this question interesting, and I wish I had an interesting answer for it. I think I would choose to have it with (Master - like Master Shake in ATHF - Edward - yes after Twilight and we had rat named Bella, it was funny - Lupin - yes I did name a cat after a fictional werewolf - shut it) Squeaks who was a stray my roommate found my senior year.

The rest of the story is sad if you like cats or have loved a pet (hence the cut), consider this fair warning. 


This is sad if you love pets/cats )
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (grrr bones/urban)
I recently checked out a book called "Curly Girl" (because I am). It's changing the way that I look at my hair and my hair products. I've been looking for a gel, spray gel, hair spray, or mousse that does not have things like Parabens, sulfates, harsh alcohols, or Silicone (this is especially important, because while it makes your hair shiny initially it actually prevents your hair from getting moisture). In the course of examining all the different products, I saw propane listed as one of the ingredients in many of the mousses. Propane in my hair? PROPANE! 

Ach, I'm pretty sure someone tried to tell me this once, but I just wasn't ready to hear it. Sometimes I'm like that. The best I've found so far is probably the John Frieda "Root Awakening" Gel, not perfect, but it does a good job and it doesn't have silicone or PROPANE in it, which is as close to a "Win" as I'm probably going to get without spending $80 or making my own out of edible Aloe Vera gel. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (grrr bones/urban)
I recently checked out a book called "Curly Girl" (because I am). It's changing the way that I look at my hair and my hair products. I've been looking for a gel, spray gel, hair spray, or mousse that does not have things like Parabens, sulfates, harsh alcohols, or Silicone (this is especially important, because while it makes your hair shiny initially it actually prevents your hair from getting moisture). In the course of examining all the different products, I saw propane listed as one of the ingredients in many of the mousses. Propane in my hair? PROPANE! 

Ach, I'm pretty sure someone tried to tell me this once, but I just wasn't ready to hear it. Sometimes I'm like that. The best I've found so far is probably the John Frieda "Root Awakening" Gel, not perfect, but it does a good job and it doesn't have silicone or PROPANE in it, which is as close to a "Win" as I'm probably going to get without spending $80 or making my own out of edible Aloe Vera gel. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (in shock look blanket bbcSH)

I find it unbelievable how quickly this year seemingly passed. And yet it also seems like eons since the events that started my year. The middle is murky and muddled and trying to remember it makes me feel confused, though there are a few things that stand apart from the others. My trip to Chicago is a blur of fabulousness but it also seems like I went ages ago. Perhaps the strangest part for me about my year is that I started it in England. I toasted in the New Year (after a very happy Christmas) in a pub in Manchester whose bartender looked a bit like a light-haired, young Jack Black and I was surrounded by my father's side of the family. Now, closing in on a year after leaving for that trip I feel disconnected from it, like it was a dream sent by some trickster spirit to taunt me.
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (in shock look blanket bbcSH)

I find it unbelievable how quickly this year seemingly passed. And yet it also seems like eons since the events that started my year. The middle is murky and muddled and trying to remember it makes me feel confused, though there are a few things that stand apart from the others. My trip to Chicago is a blur of fabulousness but it also seems like I went ages ago. Perhaps the strangest part for me about my year is that I started it in England. I toasted in the New Year (after a very happy Christmas) in a pub in Manchester whose bartender looked a bit like a light-haired, young Jack Black and I was surrounded by my father's side of the family. Now, closing in on a year after leaving for that trip I feel disconnected from it, like it was a dream sent by some trickster spirit to taunt me.
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (Murder to cheer you up bbcSH)
 
I love Christmas. Yes. I love, love, love Christmas. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (Murder to cheer you up bbcSH)
 
I love Christmas. Yes. I love, love, love Christmas. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (don eppes - seriously.)
 
For some time now I have been searching for the origins of the saying "with bells on". I kept thinking maybe it was because "court jesters" are always depicted as have bells on the ends of their hats and shoes and sometimes hung on their clothing as well. It turns out I wasn't off base by much. There's an old nursery rhyme:

"Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady upon a white horse;
With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes."

According to the American Heritage "American Idioms" dictionary, this is the origination of the saying "with bells on". I looked through quite a few phrase dictionaries before I finally found this book which is actually for people who do not speak English as a first language.

The book also mentions "paying through the nose" may (or may not, as no one is quite sure) have come from a legendary tax imposed on Ireland by the Danes in the 9th century called the "nose tax" because if someone didn't pay, their nose would be slit. 

I've also found about four different stories for the origination of "rule of thumb". I had once heard that it referred to a law that limited the diameter of the rod with which a husband could beat his wife (it was lawful to beat wives within reason, but apparently "within reason" was not so well defined).

As a side note, I love how most of the little nursery rhymes and sing-songs I sang as a kid turned out to be creepy somehow. I mean "rock-a-bye baby" sounds like it could be the plot for a horror movie, ring around the rosies/pocket full of posies references those dying of the plague, and Jack breaking his crown after going up the hill with Jill means he cracked his head when they didn't have the kind of "tumble" they were planning. And parents complain about Miley Cyrus. 

And since I'm spouting trivia - most people who say they've seen Big Ben are mistaken. Have they seen the building in which Big Ben is housed? Yes. Have they seen the clocks on the face of the building? Yes. But Big Ben is actually the bell inside the tower. Supposedly the word "clock" originally referred to "bell" because the number of times the bell rang signified the hour. Either way, Ben Ben is the big bell, so its more likely that you've heard him than seen him. 

Enough ridiculousness for one night, I've got to be up early tomorrow. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (don eppes - seriously.)
 
For some time now I have been searching for the origins of the saying "with bells on". I kept thinking maybe it was because "court jesters" are always depicted as have bells on the ends of their hats and shoes and sometimes hung on their clothing as well. It turns out I wasn't off base by much. There's an old nursery rhyme:

"Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady upon a white horse;
With rings on her fingers and bells on her toes,
She shall have music wherever she goes."

According to the American Heritage "American Idioms" dictionary, this is the origination of the saying "with bells on". I looked through quite a few phrase dictionaries before I finally found this book which is actually for people who do not speak English as a first language.

The book also mentions "paying through the nose" may (or may not, as no one is quite sure) have come from a legendary tax imposed on Ireland by the Danes in the 9th century called the "nose tax" because if someone didn't pay, their nose would be slit. 

I've also found about four different stories for the origination of "rule of thumb". I had once heard that it referred to a law that limited the diameter of the rod with which a husband could beat his wife (it was lawful to beat wives within reason, but apparently "within reason" was not so well defined).

As a side note, I love how most of the little nursery rhymes and sing-songs I sang as a kid turned out to be creepy somehow. I mean "rock-a-bye baby" sounds like it could be the plot for a horror movie, ring around the rosies/pocket full of posies references those dying of the plague, and Jack breaking his crown after going up the hill with Jill means he cracked his head when they didn't have the kind of "tumble" they were planning. And parents complain about Miley Cyrus. 

And since I'm spouting trivia - most people who say they've seen Big Ben are mistaken. Have they seen the building in which Big Ben is housed? Yes. Have they seen the clocks on the face of the building? Yes. But Big Ben is actually the bell inside the tower. Supposedly the word "clock" originally referred to "bell" because the number of times the bell rang signified the hour. Either way, Ben Ben is the big bell, so its more likely that you've heard him than seen him. 

Enough ridiculousness for one night, I've got to be up early tomorrow. 
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (Fuck you its magic Merlin v SH)
 
William Shakespeare said "Life is as tedious as a twice told tale / Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man" (King Lear). I absolutely love Shakespeare, I suppose it is possible that we make more of his writing than is actually there, but for me his writing is just like an ogre (you know, they're like onions and have layers) every time you peel a layer you find another one waiting. On the surface it’s a great metaphor, you can picture the drowsy man; I see him as the drunken drowsy that is only a few seconds away from falling off his bar stool. But many of Shakespeare's plays were revisited myths, stories, and historical characters. He made his name and his money by using stories that were already out there but changing and writing them in such a way that they became new and exciting for his audience again. He says "dull ear" like the person isn't listening. Maybe if the drowsy man was listening he'd realize that a story is not the same twice, not if its a good one. Even if the story is in print, readers experience the book differently every time they read it. For those of us who are paying attention, for those of us making something of it, no matter how small, life is not tedious. It can be hard, brutal even, but it is not tedious until one has decide that one has seen it all and there's nothing new out there to experience. Shakespeare didn't believe that twice told tales are dull (he would never have revisited so many of them himself if that were true); he believed only tired people, no longer looking at the world with sharp eyes, see twice-told tales (and life) as tedious.
float_on_alright: i'm known as actually (Fuck you its magic Merlin v SH)
 
William Shakespeare said "Life is as tedious as a twice told tale / Vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man" (King Lear). I absolutely love Shakespeare, I suppose it is possible that we make more of his writing than is actually there, but for me his writing is just like an ogre (you know, they're like onions and have layers) every time you peel a layer you find another one waiting. On the surface it’s a great metaphor, you can picture the drowsy man; I see him as the drunken drowsy that is only a few seconds away from falling off his bar stool. But many of Shakespeare's plays were revisited myths, stories, and historical characters. He made his name and his money by using stories that were already out there but changing and writing them in such a way that they became new and exciting for his audience again. He says "dull ear" like the person isn't listening. Maybe if the drowsy man was listening he'd realize that a story is not the same twice, not if its a good one. Even if the story is in print, readers experience the book differently every time they read it. For those of us who are paying attention, for those of us making something of it, no matter how small, life is not tedious. It can be hard, brutal even, but it is not tedious until one has decide that one has seen it all and there's nothing new out there to experience. Shakespeare didn't believe that twice told tales are dull (he would never have revisited so many of them himself if that were true); he believed only tired people, no longer looking at the world with sharp eyes, see twice-told tales (and life) as tedious.

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